G-d’s Place - Jewish Outlook

Welcome To Jewish Outlook

G-d’s Place

 

   When a person falls into doubt and great confusion, then he begins to look at himself and he sees that he is very far from G-d’s kavod [honor, glory]. Then he begins to search for G-d and to cry out, “Where is G-d? Where is the place of His glory?” That is the beginning of repentance, because the essence of repentance is looking for, and running after, G-d’s honor.

 

As a person cries out, “Where is G-d?” he makes G-d manifest in the lowest depths. The very asking is the beginning of his rising and touching the highest levels of G-d’s kavod. That is why falling down is the beginning of rising up.

 

When you ask, “Where is G-d? Where is G-d’s glory?” when you don’t know where G-d’s place is, then G-d reveals His place to you. This is the holy Beit HaMikdash, the holy Temple.

 

Before Mashiach comes we will ask, “Where is G-d? Where is G-d’s place? Where is the place of His glory?” There will be such a tremendous, powerful asking, that G-d, so to speak, will have to build the Holy Temple.

 

If you fall down to the lowest level and you really think, “G-d can’t be where I am because I am too far gone,” then you actually have a chance to reach the highest place.

 

Before Mashiach comes, when it looks like G-d is completely absent, then we will really find the place of G-d in the world. Because we obviously didn’t really find G-d’s place yet, otherwise the Holy Temple would not have been destroyed.

 

Only when you realize that you really have absolutely no place in the world and so you really ask where G-d is – then G-d can talk to you again.


Search

       News  
 

Daily Torah Quote

Joke of the day

poor man came to the house of an elderly couple. Unfortunately they had nothing in the house to give him except an old piece of fish “from before the time of Noah’s Ark and the flood.” Out of desperation, they served him this fish and the next thing they knew he had to be rushed to the hospital. The elderly couple, of course, accompanied him to the hospital but, unfortunately, watched him die in front of their eyes.

At the funeral the elderly woman was crying uncontrollably and her husband was having a hard time trying to console her. She was hysterically screaming, “The fish killed him, the fish killed him.”

The husband who couldn’t stand to see his wife in such a state comforted her and said, “My darling, it’s really not that bad. We had the merit of fulfilling three good deeds: Welcoming guests, visiting the sick, and escorting the deceased!”