Prayer - Jewish Outlook

Welcome To Jewish Outlook

Prayer

 

  How do you know which part of the service the congregation has reached? It’s very simple – if one third of the congregation is outside then they are davening (praying); if half the congregation is outside then they’re reading the Torah (Bible). Ah, but if everyone is outside then the Rabbi must be giving a speech!

To Rebbe Shlomo, prayer meant singing the prayers with all one’s heart. Every Shabbos, Rebbe Shlomo would lead the prayers with singing and dancing, bringing life and joy into the ritual prayers.

 

One person recounts, “I remember the first time I prayed with Rebbe Shlomo. I had never before experienced such an amazing feeling of ecstasy and true holiness. It felt as if Heaven and earth were merging, and there was a wonderful outpouring of love among all of us in the Synagogue.”

 

A man came to the Holy Baal Shem Tov and said, “Please pray for my child. My child is so sick.” The Baal Shem Tov, who lived about 250 years ago, replied, “Wait, I’ll get some people to pray with me.” He went down to the dark streets, and found ten thieves. They all prayed together and the child revived. People asked the Holy Baal Shem Tov, “Can’t you pray with decent people?” He said, “You don’t understand. The gates of Heaven were closed. I needed thieves to break them open.”

 

Jewish meditation is not just a way to be more centered or balanced; it is much deeper. Prayer is the time when I speak to GYd as the Master of the World. Meditation is when it is clear to me that GYd is my best friend. GYd is closer to me than my own breath.

 

Even if you never prayed in your life, if next to you people are praying with joy, the joy is contagious, like a little holy disease; you catch it on the spot.

 

Rebbe Nachman says: When you pray in the field, every blade of grass comes to help you and gives you strength to pray.

 

We always think that if you pray well, that this is the greatest prayer. Maybe the greatest prayer in the world is if you don’t know how to pray and you want to pray. Maybe that is the greatest prayer.

 

The highest level of teshuva [returning to GYd] is when I say to GYd, “You have to answer me. You have to tell me what I was created for.” But in the deepest depths I don’t need an answer. All I need is a little attention.

The deepest prayer is, “GYd, I don’t need an answer, I just want You to listen.”

 

When I come into Synagogue, I don’t want to find the same thing I found on the street. I want something to lift me up. I want to get into a little holy elevator.

 

   How do you know which part of the service the congregation has reached? It’s very simple – if one third of the congregation is outside then they are davening (praying); if half the congregation is outside then they’re reading the Torah (Bible). Ah, but if everyone is outside then the Rabbi must be giving a speech!

To Rebbe Shlomo, prayer meant singing the prayers with all one’s heart. Every Shabbos, Rebbe Shlomo would lead the prayers with singing and dancing, bringing life and joy into the ritual prayers.

 

One person recounts, “I remember the first time I prayed with Rebbe Shlomo. I had never before experienced such an amazing feeling of ecstasy and true holiness. It felt as if Heaven and earth were merging, and there was a wonderful outpouring of love among all of us in the Synagogue.”

 

A man came to the Holy Baal Shem Tov and said, “Please pray for my child. My child is so sick.” The Baal Shem Tov, who lived about 250 years ago, replied, “Wait, I’ll get some people to pray with me.” He went down to the dark streets, and found ten thieves. They all prayed together and the child revived. People asked the Holy Baal Shem Tov, “Can’t you pray with decent people?” He said, “You don’t understand. The gates of Heaven were closed. I needed thieves to break them open.”

 

Jewish meditation is not just a way to be more centered or balanced; it is much deeper. Prayer is the time when I speak to GYd as the Master of the World. Meditation is when it is clear to me that GYd is my best friend. GYd is closer to me than my own breath.

 

Even if you never prayed in your life, if next to you people are praying with joy, the joy is contagious, like a little holy disease; you catch it on the spot.

 

Rebbe Nachman says: When you pray in the field, every blade of grass comes to help you and gives you strength to pray.

 

We always think that if you pray well, that this is the greatest prayer. Maybe the greatest prayer in the world is if you don’t know how to pray and you want to pray. Maybe that is the greatest prayer.

 

The highest level of teshuva [returning to GYd] is when I say to GYd, “You have to answer me. You have to tell me what I was created for.” But in the deepest depths I don’t need an answer. All I need is a little attention.

The deepest prayer is, “GYd, I don’t need an answer, I just want You to listen.”

 

When I come into Synagogue, I don’t want to find the same thing I found on the street. I want something to lift me up. I want to get into a little holy elevator.

 


Search

       News  
 

Daily Torah Quote

Joke of the day

A not–so–young man and woman were sitting on the porch of the hotel catching a little breeze. The woman turned to the man and said, “It’s really something – you look exactly like my third husband.”

The gentleman asked her, “How many times have you been married?”

She replied, “Only twice so far!”


 Powered by Max Banner Ads 

 Powered by Max Banner Ads