What do you Really Want? - Jewish Outlook

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What do you Really Want?

Your own preciousness

I really don’t know how much I am worth. If G-d would give me a taste of my own neshama [soul], my whole life would change.
The question is not only if you know that you are precious. Because if I walk around and say, “I am precious, but you… listen, I know you are not,” it means you never tasted your own preciousness. Because your own preciousness is so divine and so holy that if you mamash know what is precious about you, then every person you meet, you bring forth their preciousness too.

Who are all the big Rebbes? Why when I stand next to the Lubavicher Rebbe, when I stand next to the Amshinover Rebbe, I am a different person? Because, at that moment, that which is precious about me, is mamash shining. So their presence is so special.

What do I really love?

Rebbe Nachman says… Do you really think we love what we want to love? Most of us love everything we don’t really want to love.

Friends, sometimes you can spend a thousand years, and only in the last minute of your life is it clear to you that everything you did in your life you didn’t want to do it. “This is not what I want.”

When do you reach the moment that it is clear to you; “What do I really love? What do I really want?” It is at those great moments when you are alone with G-d. When your own preciousness is shining so much. We need this the most.

Why is it that when you stand by the holy Wall something happens to you and you realize, that maybe all those things you want, you don’t really want.

Friends, I just want you to open your hearts. What is the holy Wall? How did King Solomon build the holy Temple? King Solomon collected the preciousness of every human being in the world. Unbelievable. And from that he built the House of G-d. Obviously he didn’t build it just from stones. That is just the outside. But the inside….


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Daily Torah Quote

Joke of the day

How do you know which part of the service the congregation has reached? It’s very simple – if one third of the congregation is outside then they are davening (praying); if half the congregation is outside then they’re reading the Torah (Bible). Ah, but if everyone is outside then the Rabbi must be giving a speech!